Book Club

Congregation B’nai Israel’s Book Club offers an opportunity to meet new people and enjoy a lively and intellectual discussion every month. The book club is open to both members and their friends and is an informal, fun group. We hope to see you there!

For more information contact Marilyn Bliden or call 561.254.1351


 

Thursday, February 28. 2019
7:00 pm
Feldman Children’s Library

The Tattooist of Auschwitz by Heather Morris

In April 1942, Lale Sokolov, a Slovakian Jew, is forcibly transported to the concentration camps at Auschwitz-Birkenau. When his captors discover that he speaks several languages, he is put to work as a Tätowierer (the German word for tattooist), tasked with permanently marking his fellow prisoners. Imprisoned for more than two and a half years, Lale witnesses horrific atrocities and barbarism–but also incredible acts of bravery and compassion. Risking his own life, he uses his privileged position to exchange jewels and money from murdered Jews for food to keep his fellow prisoners alive. One day in July 1942, Lale, prisoner 32407, comforts a trembling young woman waiting in line to have the number 34902 tattooed onto her arm. Her name is Gita, and in that first encounter, Lale vows to somehow survive the camp and marry her. A vivid, harrowing, and ultimately hopeful re-creation of Lale Sokolov’s experiences as the man who tattooed the arms of thousands of prisoners with what would become one of the most potent symbols of the Holocaust, The Tattooist of Auschwitz is also a testament to the endurance of love and humanity under the darkest possible conditions”


Thursday, March 28. 2019
7:00 pm
Feldman Children’s Library

Janet Kleinman will be leading the discussion!

The Bridal Chair by Gloria Goldreich

Beautiful Ida Chagall, the only daughter of Marc Chagall, is blossoming in the Paris art world beyond her father’s controlling gaze. But her newfound independence is short-lived. In Nazi-occupied Paris, Chagall’s status as a Jewish artist has made them all targets, yet his devotion to his art blinds him to their danger.  When Ida falls in love and Chagall angrily paints an empty wedding chair (The Bridal Chair) in response, she faces an impossible choice: Does she fight to forge her own path outside her father’s shadow, or abandon her ambitions to save Chagall from his enemies and himself?